incidentalcomics:

Conflict in Literature

incidentalcomics:

Conflict in Literature

(via yahighway)

I don’t even want to write during the summer. I just want to stay in bed and reread Not a Drop to Drink 5000 times. 

victoriousvocabulary:

FRIGUS
[noun]
1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.
2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.
3. the coldness of death; death.
4. a chill, fever.
5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).
6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).
7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).
[a-hour - The Queen]

victoriousvocabulary:

FRIGUS

[noun]

1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.

2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.

3. the coldness of death; death.

4. a chill, fever.

5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).

6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).

7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).

[a-hour - The Queen]

victoriousvocabulary:

TERRENE
[adjective]
earthly; of or like the earth.
Etymology: from Anglo-French terreine, terrin, Latin terrenus, ”of earth”, from terra, “earth”.
[Fred Fields]

victoriousvocabulary:

TERRENE

[adjective]

earthly; of or like the earth.

Etymology: from Anglo-French terreine, terrin, Latin terrenus, ”of earth”, from terra, “earth”.

[Fred Fields]

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

(via agonyofanuntoldstory)

victoriousvocabulary:

EXSILIUM
[noun]
1. exile, banishment.
2. (poetic) place of exile, retreat.
3. (figuratively, in the plural) exiles; exiled people.
Etymology: from Latin exsul, “an exiled person”.
[Tomasz Alen Kopera - Exile]

victoriousvocabulary:

EXSILIUM

[noun]

1. exile, banishment.

2. (poetic) place of exile, retreat.

3. (figuratively, in the plural) exiles; exiled people.

Etymology: from Latin exsul, “an exiled person”.

[Tomasz Alen Kopera - Exile]

victoriousvocabulary:

MORIOR
[verb]
1. to die, wither away, decay. 
2. I die.
3. I wither; I decay.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European *mer- “to die”.
[noiaillustration]

victoriousvocabulary:

MORIOR

[verb]

1. to die, wither away, decay. 

2. I die.

3. I wither; I decay.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European *mer- “to die”.

[noiaillustration]

victoriousvocabulary:

TOURNESOL
[noun]
sunflower; any of various composite plants of the genus Helianthus, as H. annuus, having showy, yellow-rayed flower heads often 12 inches (30 cm) wide, and edible seeds that yield an oil with a wide variety of uses.
Etymology: French, from tourner (from Old French torner, from Latin tornāre, present active infinitive of tornō, “turn” + sol (from Latin sol, “sun”).
[Oscar-Claude Monet]

victoriousvocabulary:

TOURNESOL

[noun]

sunflower; any of various composite plants of the genus Helianthus, as H. annuus, having showy, yellow-rayed flower heads often 12 inches (30 cm) wide, and edible seeds that yield an oil with a wide variety of uses.

Etymology: French, from tourner (from Old French torner, from Latin tornāre, present active infinitive of tornō, “turn” + sol (from Latin sol, “sun”).

[Oscar-Claude Monet]